Summer 2015 deadlines for Proposals, Defenses, and Final Submissions

N.B.:  All proposals should be submitted to your individual committee members for their approval at least one week before the submission deadline. (Earlier submission to the committee is strongly advised.)  Otherwise, you cannot expect faculty members to read and approve drafts in time to meet deadlines.

All proposals must be submitted as a Word-compatible email attachment sent to alice.salazar1@utdallas.edu . All signature pages must be submitted in hard copy.

20 May
Proposals for Portfolios, Theses, and Dissertations due in the A & H Office (for GSC consideration on 3 June).

(This is the only submission date for M.A. students wishing to graduate in the Summer 2015 semester. Enrollment in Summer or Fall semester is required for all submissions.)

3 June
Last day for submission of final draft of dissertations to all members of the supervising committee.  Doctoral students who do not meet this deadline will not graduate this semester.

10 June
Applications for Graduation due

11 June
Last day for submission of final draft of portfolios and theses to all members of the supervising committee.  M.A. students who do not meet this deadline will not graduate this semester.

25 June – 12 noon
Last day for requests for oral defense of dissertations, theses, and portfolios

9 July
Last day for defense of dissertations, theses, and portfolios

16 July – 12 noon
Last day for final submissions of dissertations to Office of Graduate Dean

23 July – 12 noon
Last day for final submissions of theses (to the Office of the Graduate Dean) and portfolios  (to the A & H Office)

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Spring 2015 Graduate Travel Grant deadline March 30

Graduate Dean Austin Cunningham, Dean Kratz, and the faculty of the School of Arts & Humanities wish to encourage graduate students in all 5 degree programs to present their creative or scholarly work at professional conferences, symposia, and workshops. To that end, we will award 6 to 8 travel grants of $350 in the Spring 2015 semester. Graduate Travel Grants take the form of reimbursement for travel expenses.

Graduate students who have applied to participate or have been accepted to participate in a professional conference, symposium, or workshop held within the United States should submit the application below by the appropriate deadline.

Spring 2015 deadline: 30 March 2015.

Every graduate student applying for a travel grant must fill out a hard copy of the Travel Authorization Form available from Lisa Lyles in the Dean’s Suite (JO 4.510) and return it to Ms. Lyles.  (Do not fill out the indemnification and medical forms unless you are actually awarded funds.)

Be sure to save proof of your expenditures for lodging and conference registration fees. (University regulations generally do not allow for reimbursement of plane fares.)

The Graduate Studies Committee will make its decision giving priority to the following factors: academic record, seniority in graduate program, relation of presentation to final project (thesis, portfolio, dissertation), selectivity of conference, and degree of participation in conference.

Due to limited funds, students may receive travel grants only twice in their graduate career.

If you have any questions about the application process, feel free to contact Associate Dean Michael Wilson (mwilson@utdallas.edu).

Please email completed form to mwilson@utdallas.edu

Lecture – “Love Slaves and Wonder Women: Radical Feminism and Social Reform in the Psychology of William Moulton Marston”

The next lecture in this year’s Center for Values in Medicine, Science, and Technology lecture series on “Sexing Science, Gendering Technology” will be by Dr. Matt Brown:

 “Love Slaves and Wonder Women: Radical Feminism and Social Reform in the Psychology of William Moulton Marston”

THIS Wednesday, March 25, 7:30 pm, Jonsson Performance Hall, UT Dallas

This is the culmination of a long-term project that involves history and philosophy of science, history of feminism and the women’s movement, history of popular culture, literature, and comics studies. I would be honored to see you there.

I have a draft of a paper in progress (much more academic in nature than the presentation will be) with the same title as the talk on Wednesday. If you’d like to have a look before the lecture (or after), I’d be happy to send it to you.

Here’s the abstract for the paper:

In contemporary histories of psychology, William Moulton Marston (1893-1947) is sometimes remembered for helping develop the lie detector test. He is better remembered in history of popular culture for creating the comic book superhero Wonder Woman. In his time, however, he was a significant psychologist and public figure, contributing to research in deception, basic emotions, abnormal psychology, sexuality, and consciousness. He was also a radical though unorthodox feminist with deep connections to women’s rights movements. Marston’s work is instructive in several ways for philosophers of science, particularly on the question of the relation between science and values. Although Marston’s case provides further evidence of the beneficial role that feminist values can play in scientific work, nevertheless, it poses challenges to philosophical accounts of value-laden science. Marston’s feminist values allow him to identify weaknesses in the research of other psychologists, and they allow him to posit psychological concepts that avoid reifying social stereotypes; this aspect of his work exemplifies earlier views about feminist value-laden research. His scientific work also implies *normative* conclusions about psycho-emotional health for individuals and society, a direction of influence that is relatively under-theorized in the literature. Furthermore, Marston makes use of the popular press as an unusual venue of the *application* of his scientific research as well as the advocacy of his radical values. To understand and evaluate Marston’s work requires an approach that treats science and values as mutually influencing; it also requires that we understand the relationship between science advising and political advocacy in value-laden science.

English teaching position – Hockaday

Job Title: US English Teacher, 2015-16 School Year

Job Description: The Hockaday School is seeking an Upper School English teacher to join the faculty of its English Department. The primary goal of the English Department at The Hockaday School is to develop students to be critical readers, writers, and thinkers who read literature to understand their self and place in the world and write authentically for a variety of audiences and purposes. To accomplish these goals, English teachers embrace a student-centered pedagogy, which involves both conferring with students individually and facilitating collaborative writing workshops to promote confidence and skills in writing.

Qualified candidates will possess a mastery of subject, versatility in the classroom, and commitment to the success of their students. They will be passionate about the literature they teach, and, because they themselves enjoy writing, they will instill this enthusiasm in their students. Knowledgeable in global, British, and American literature, facile in situating literature in an interdisciplinary context, and as comfortable with research and rhetoric as they are with narrative, ideal candidates will be proficient in teaching at all levels in the Upper School. Finally, qualified candidates will embrace the Tenets of Faculty Excellence by being lifelong learners, striving for continual professional development. In addition to teaching responsibilities, the teacher will serve as an Advisor, sponsor clubs as needed, and be available for student extracurricular activities.

Qualifications / Experience:

  • An advanced degree in English or the Humanities.
  • Experience teaching a range of levels in US English.
  • Familiarity with contemporary composition theory and twenty-first century forms of literacy
  • An understanding of the pedagogies of the writing workshop, with experience in a writing center a plus.
  • A commitment to the ideals expressed in the Tenets of Faculty Excellence document.
  • A commitment to being a supportive and energetic colleague and mentor.

Interested candidates should submit a letter of interest, statement of teaching philosophy, and all college transcripts (unofficial acceptable) to        Recruitment @hockaday.org.

Reminder – Spring 2015 Travel Grants deadline March 30, 2015.

Graduate Dean Austin Cunningham, Dean Kratz, and the faculty of the School of Arts & Humanities wish to encourage graduate students in all 5 degree programs to present their creative or scholarly work at professional conferences, symposia, and workshops. To that end, we will award 6 to 8 travel grants of $350 in the Spring 2015 semester. Graduate Travel Grants take the form of reimbursement for travel expenses.

Graduate students who have applied to participate or have been accepted to participate in a professional conference, symposium, or workshop held within the United States should submit the application by the deadline of March 30, 2015.

East Texas Historical Association Award and Grants

Each year the East Texas Historical Association presents its Ottis Lock Awards and Research Grants at it Fall Meeting, which for 2015 will be held from October 8-10, 2015 at Stephen F. Austin State University in Nacogdoches.

Each year the East Texas Historical Association presents its Ottis Lock Awards and Research Grants at it Fall Meeting, which for 2015 will be held from October 8-10, 2015 at Stephen F. Austin State University in Nacogdoches. Two of those awards should be of interest to your faculty and students. The first of those is the Educator of the Year, a monetary award (determined by the Ottis Lock decision committee) that honors an outstanding professional in the field of higher education each year. The second of those are our research grants. A number of research grant awards involving East Texas history will be made annually, usually in amounts of $500 to $1000. Applications will be accepted on our form, and should include name, address of the researcher (with biographical data), the purpose for which the funds would be spent, a general statement of anticipated benefit and uses.

The Association encourages you to nominate one of your faculty members for the Educator Award, and also asks you to urge anyone within your department conducting research pertaining to Texas history, with preference given to East Texas topics, to apply for a research grant. You or your colleagues can find the application forms at the following addresses:

http://easttexashistorical.org/v3/programs/grants.htm

http://easttexashistorical.org/v3/programs/lock.htm

 

The deadline for each application is May 1.

Skip Hollandsworth at UTD on Thursday, March 12

Our speaker for the 2015 Spring Semester will be journalist, filmmaker, and screenwriter, Skip Hollandsworth. His appearance on campus, originally scheduled for February 25, has been rescheduled for Thursday, March 12. On that afternoon, he will be available to meet with students informally at the library in Green Center at 4 p.m., on Thursday, March 12. That evening at 7:30, there will be a screening of the 2012 feature film Bernie, directed by Richard Linklater and starring Shirley MacLaine, Jack Black, and Matthew McConaughey. Mr. Hollandsworth co-wrote the script with Mr. Linklater. It was based on Mr. Hollandsworth’s 1998 Texas Monthly article, “Midnight in the Garden of East Texas,” which depicts the murder of an 82-year-old woman, Marjorie Nugent, by her 39-year-old companion, Bernhardt “Bernie” Tiede. Informed readers will be aware that Tiede has been lately in the news as his case and sentencing have come up for judicial reconsideration. Following the screening, Mr. Hollandsworth will make brief remarks and engage in a question-and-answer session with the audience. This should be of particular interest to students with an interest in filmmaking, adaptation, journalism, and communication.

The screening and Q&A will take place in JO 3.516.

Mr. Hollandsworth, executive editor for Texas Monthly, is an award-winning journalist whose career began in Dallas. His articles have been recognized nationally as well as regionally, and he is an enthusiastic and personable individual who will provide a unique and entertaining evening following the screening of his film.